Porsche Cayman 2013 Review

As we know, the 2013 Porsche Cayman will be thoroughly redesigned. Expected modifications include a more powerful base engine, a roomier interior, В and more special exterior styling. As in the redesigned Boxster, a new direct-injected 2.7-liter flat-6 will serve as the base engine for the Cayman. Although smaller than before, the engine runs at higher compression and now wrings out an expected 265 hp (10 more horses than before). The additional power comes at a slight expense of torque (down 7 to 207 pound-feet), but overall this should be an improved mill, with better acceleration and fuel economy.

Aiding better fuel economy — and likely faster 0-60 times — are a lighter body and chassis. Like the Boxster, the 2013 Porsche Cayman will use aluminum in place of steel for key body panels and components, and should emerge anywhere from 60-100 pounds lighter. At the same time, the new Cayman has grown slightly. The wheelbase is an inch longer, and the wheels are pushed out an additional 2.5 inches.

As in the redesigned Boxster, a new direct-injected 2.7-liter flat-6 will serve as the base engine for the Cayman. Although smaller than before, the engine runs at higher compression and now wrings out an expected 265 hp (10 more horses than before). The additional power comes at a slight expense of torque (down 7 to 207 pound-feet), but overall this should be an improved mill, with better acceleration and fuel economy.

A lighter frame should make the Cayman even quicker in the curves, although we’ll have to see how the new electric steering system affects handling. If the new 911 (also the recipient of the new electric system) is any indicator, the new steering will feel transparent to all but the most seasoned Cayman owner.

As usual with Porsche, optioning a Cayman is a quick route to poverty, especially when adding features like new dynamic transmission mounts and torque vectoring, which uses a mechanical locking differential to shift torque between the rear wheels. Eighteen-inch wheels should come standard, with 19-inchers optional, as are adaptive xenon headlamps and carbon-ceramic brakes.

Free the Cayman.” Since the Porsche Cayman’s debut back in 2007, enthusiasts have been asking for just that, wishing Porsche would give its midengine coupe enough horsepower to challenge the 911 for familial supremacy. That’s unlikely to happen — ever — but the 2013 Porsche Cayman is still a fine update to a car that some believe is only about 50 horsepower away from being equal or even greater than a 911.

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